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Europe’s Leading Public-Private Partnership for Cloud

The Helix Nebula Initiative is a partnership between industry, space and science to establish a dynamic ecosystem, benefiting from open cloud services for the seamless integration of science into a business environment. Today, the partnership counts over 40 public and private partners.

End-User

The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is The Research University in the Helmholtz Association. Its major research areas are based on long-term societal challenges and seek to develop sustainable solutions to urgent future questions. The objective is to contribute importantly, by top-level research, teaching, and innovation, to the success of major societal projects, such as the “energiewende,” or safe and sustainable mobility or intelligent technologies for information society. The focus is on energy, mobility, and information.

The Science and Technology Facilities Council is a UK government body that carries out civil research in science and engineering, and funds UK research in areas including particle physics, nuclear physics, space science and astronomy.

DESY is one of the world’s leading accelerator centres. Researchers use the large-scale facilities at DESY to explore the microcosm in all its variety – from the interactions of tiny elementary particles and the behaviour of new types of nanomaterials to biomolecular processes that are essential to life.

The Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (National Centre for Scientific Research) is a government-funded research organisation, under the administrative authority of France's Ministry of Research. CNRS's annual budget represents a quarter of French public spending on civilian research. As the largest fundamental research organisation in Europe, CNRS carries out research in all fields of knowledge, through its ten CNRS Institutes.

The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) is one of the most powerful synchrotron radiation source in Europe. Each year several thousand researchers travel to Grenoble, where they work in a first-class scientific environment to conduct exciting experiments at the cutting edge of modern science.

ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. ESO provides state-of-the-art research facilities to astronomers and is supported by Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. Several other countries have expressed an interest in membership.

The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is an independent intergovernmental organisation supported by 34 states. ECMWF is both a research institute and a 24/7 operational service, producing and disseminating numerical weather predictions to its Member States. This data is fully available to the national meteorological services in the Member States. The Centre also offers a catalogue of forecast data that can be purchased by businesses worldwide and other commercial customers.

PIC, (Port d’Informació Científica: "Scientific Information Port"), is a data center of excellence for scientific-data processing supporting scientific groups working in projects which require strong computing resources for the analysis of massive sets of distributed data.

The European Space Agency (ESA) is Europe’s gateway to space. Its mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Exploring the Universe, and sending satellites and humans into space are among the major challenges for developed nations in the 21st century.

The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) is one of the world’s top research institutions dedicated to basic research in the molecular life sciences. It is funded by 20 member states, mostly European, and Australia as associate member. The main laboratory is in Heidelberg (DE) and with EMBL outstations in Grenoble, Hamburg, Monterotondo and Hinxton.

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